INTRODUCTION
 

INTRODUCTORY

THE CHAPTER DEALS WITH THE HISTORICAL AND STRUCTURAL aspects of the various means of transport and communications, viz., railways, roads, post and telegraphs and radios. And as such, an attempt has been made to give a detailed description of railways, roads and the facilities regarding public transport. Our findings reveal that there has been considerable progress in the , field of transport facilities available to the public since the last two decades. The development activities under the auspices of the five-year plans have contributed a lion's share towards the development of roads and railways since 1950-51.

 
 
Railways
 
 
 

Nagpur occupies a central and strategic position regarding railway communications. Nagpur is advantageously situated on Bombay-Calcutta rail link and Delhi-Madras Grand Trunk route, affording easy movement of goods.( Socio-Economic Review and District Statistical Abstract of Nagpur District,) Nagpur is the junction of the Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur-Howrah line, the Nagpur-Itarsi line (Grand Trunk route), the Nagpur-Chhind-wada line, the Nagpur-Ramtek line and the Nagpur-Chanda line. Nagpur district takes pride of place as it is being served by railways from 1867. The length of the railway routes in the district is about 354.056 km. (220 miles) of which 215.652 km. (134 miles) are broad gauge and 138.404 km. (86 miles) are narrow gauge. The district has 86.905 km. (54 miles) of railway line per 258.999 km2 (100 sq. miles). A similar proportion for the Indian Union is only 72.52 km2 (28 miles). Whereas the Indian Union has 16.0934 km. (10 miles) of railway line per lakh of population this district has about 27.3588 km. (17 miles).(Socio-Economic Review and District Statistical Abstract of Nagpur District 1958-59, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Government of Maharashtra, Bombay.)

As a result of regrouping of the Indian Railways, the Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur route and the Nagpur-Itarsi route which were formerly under the Great Indian Peninsula Railway were grouped in 1952 under the Central Railway. The other routes in the district which were formerly under the Bengal-Nagpur Railway System were grouped in 1952 under the South-Eastern Railway

Railway Routes

Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur- Howrah-Route


The portion of the Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur route falling within Nagpur district was opened for traffic in 1867. The double line was constructed between 1918 and 1922. The length of the line is about 43.4523 km. (27 miles) in Nagpur. The Nagpur-Howrah line was originally constructed on the metre gauge in 1881 as the Chhattisgad State Railway. In 1888 the line was
converted, under the auspices of the Bengal-Nagpur Company,to the broad gauge and carried hrough to.Calcutta.( Central Provinces District Gazetteers, Nagpur District, Vol. A, 1908, page 198,) Its length in, the district is about 57.718 km. (34 miles).

The Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur-Howrah route traverses the Buldhana, Akola, Amravati and Wardha districts of Vidarbha before entering Nagpur. It enters Nagpur after leaving Sindi railway station in Wardha district. It runs through the heart of the district. The topography through which this Hue passes is plain with a few hills and is more dry than green.

From Nagpur onwards the line passes through a countryside rich with manganese ore and orange orchards. It touches the ancient and important town of Kamptee.

The stations on this route (with their distance from Bombay) are, Borkhedi 801.45 km. (498 miles), Buti Bori 809.50 km. (503 miles), Gumgaon 819.16 km. (509 miles), Khapri 825.59 km. (513 miles), Ajni 833.64 km. (518 miles) and Nagpur 836.86 km. (520 miles).

Nagpur is an important station and a junction on the Central Railway as well as the South-Eastern Railway. It has a magnificent station building with one spacious III Class waiting hall, three Upper Class waiting rooms, and three retiring rooms which are well-equipped. There are five platforms for broad gauge trains and one for narrow gauge trains. All these platforms are paved, covered and electrified. Fans and clocks have been provided on the platforms. There are separate booking offices for Upper and III Class passengers at the station, while there are city booking offices at Sitabuldi and Itwari. Amenities like enquiry office, reservation of seats, public call office, cloak room, cold water, hook stalls, etc., have been provided at Nagpur. There are four tea stalls, one vegetarian and one non-vegetarian refreshment rooms. The station is situated in the heart of the city and convenient transport facilities such as a city bus service, taxis, tongas, rikshaws, etc., are always available at the station.

Nagpur is the headquarters of the Nagpur Division of the Central Railway and also of the South-Eastern Railway, it occupies a strategic position, as the Delhi-Madras Grand Trunk Railway route and three other railway routes pass through it. There is a huge passenger as well as goods traffic to and from Nagpur. Since the opening of the railway route, huge quantities of manganese ore and other minerals are exported from Nagpur. It has also assumed an added importance due to the transport of oranges. Nagpur is said to be the biggest orange market in India. Oranges are exported to Delhi, Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, etc.

The passenger trains running daily on this railway route are: (1) Bombay-Howrah Mail via Nagpur, (2) Bombay-Howrah Express, (3) Bombay-Nagpur Express, (4) Bhusawal-Nagpur Passenger, (5) Bhusawal-Nagpur Passenger, (6) Bhusawal-Nagpur Fast. Passenger, (7) Delhi-Madras Janata Express, (8.) New Delhi-Madras Biweekly De-Luxe Express and (9) Grand Trunk Express.

The following is the statement showing the number of passengers hooked and tonnage of goods traffic from the stations on this route within limits of Nagpur district during the year 1958-59.

TABLE No. 1 PASSENGER AND GOODS TRAFFIC FROM VARIOUS STATIONS DURING
THE YEAR 1958-59

Station
Number of passengers booked
† Tonnage of goods cleared (in Metric tons)
Chief items of export
1
2
3
4
5
*Borkhedi
43,964
Butibori
74,824
807.55
(795)
Miscellaneous items.
*Gumgaon
68,181
Khapri
32,104
Nagpur
9,26,072
40,654.193
(40,012)
Foodgrains, orange,
timber, bidi leaves, cotton,
cotton seed, etc.
Nagpur city booking
office.
51,723
Itwari (Nagpur).
63,091.625
(62,095)
Rice, pulsts, timber, bidi
leaves.

TABLE No. 2
NUMBER OF PASSENGERS BOOKED FROM THE STATIONS* IN NAGPUR DISTRICT DURING 1959-60 AND 1960-61

Station
1959-60
1960-61
1
2
3
1. Nagpur
5,74,359
6,80,547
2. Itwari
10,96,277
10,59,647
3. Kamptee
9,66,819
9,52,407
4. Kanhan
1,08,124
1,04,565
5. Dumri Khurd
38,118
37,287
6. Mansar
32,122
26,109
7. Ramtek
1,61,090
1,60,077
8. Saiwa
39,435
40,368
9. Chacher
42,323
47,667
10. Tharsa
53,885
72,974
11. Rewral
43,132
47,918
12. Khat
71,240
66,000

*Goods are not booked at these stations

† Figures in brackets indicate tons,

 

TABLE No. 3
STATEMENT OF GOODS BOOKED FROM VARIOUS STATIONS* DURING 1959-60 AND 1960-61

[Figures in metric tons]

Station
Manganese Ore
Rice
Grains and Pulses
Timber
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Itwari
36,524.184 (35,949)
2,280.932 (2,245)
1,450.919 (1,428)
64,223.615 (63,219)
3,252.38 3,201)
1,47,935.609 (1,45,599)
97,776.523 (96,232)
Kamptee
2,495.219 (2,456)
Metric tons 10,252.961 (10,091)
884.980 (871)
961183 (946))
353.585 (348)
23,628093 (23,255)
Kanhan
28,515.043 (28,065)
38,711.605 (38,100)
233.691 (230)
Dumri Khurd
2,302.209 (2,266)
Metric tons 14,651.441 (14,420)
Ramtek
8,59,863.506 (8,46,281)
9,05,595.205 (8,91,290)
Tharsa
2,255.631 (2,220)
36.578 (36)
355.617 (350)
283.478 (279)
Khat
353.585 (348)
381019 1 (375)
Rewral
979.472 (964)
2.290.166 (2,234)

 

 
Station
Oilseeds
Bidis
Iron
Cement
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1959-60
1960-61
1
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
Itwari
116.846 (115)
110.749 (109)
..
551.715 (543)
1,787.227 (1,759)
2,244.354 (2,209)
53,408.668 (52,565)
1,151.135 (1,133)
Kamptee
83.316 (82)
53.850 (53)
12,506.954 (12,309)
18,539.964 (18,247)
6,415.335 (6,314)
8,781.720 (8,643)
38,132.501 (37,530)
32,897.667 (32,378)
Kanhan
812.840 (800)
201.178 (198)
57,322.693 (56,417)
44,536.370 (43,833)
9,345.628 (9,198)
2,432.451 (2,394)
Dumri Khurd
Ramtek
Tharsa
293.638 (289)
103.637 (102)
20.321 (20)
Khat
1,086.107 (1,069)
263.157 (259)
Rewral
3.048 (3)
4-064 (4)

*These stations .are under the South-Eastern Railway. Figures in brackets indicate tons.

 

Nagpur-Itarsi Route

The portion of the Nagpur-Itarsi Grand Trunk railway route , passing through this district was opened for traffic between 1923 and 1924.( History of Indian Railways : Ministry of Railways, Government of India.)

Starting from Nagpur, it runs towards the north-west through the Nagpur and Katol tahsils. It crosses a distance of about 93.342 km. (58 miles) and enters Chhindwada district of Madhya Pradesh. The stations on this line (with their distance from Nagpur) are: Bharatwada 12.8748 km. (8 miles), Kalmeshwar 24.1402 km. (15 miles), Kohli 37.0149 km. (23 miles), Metpanjra 51.499 km. (32 miles), Katol 61.155 km. (38 miles), Kalambha 70.811 km. (44 miles) and Narkhcd 86.905 km. (54 miles).

This is a broad gauge 1.677 metres (5' 6") line with good foundation. The countryside through which it passes is even and plain. It has opened up the rich cotton tracks and orange orchards around Katol. It is of great importance to Nagpur district in as much as it has facilitated goods and passenger traffic to North India. It has made possible direct access to Delhi. Besides Nagpur, Kalmeshwar, Katol and Narkhed are the important stations.

The passenger trains running on this route are: (i) Grand Trunk Express, (ii) Madras-New Delhi Bi-weekly De Luxe ; Express, (iii) Madras-Delhi Janata Express, (iv) Nagpur-New | Delhi Passenger, (v) Nagpur-Juhbulpore Passenger, and (vi) Nagpur-Betul Passenger.

All the stations are provided with buildings, booking offices and quarters for the staff. Kalmeshwar, Katol and Narkhed stations a*e provided with light refreshment stalls.

The following is the statement showing the number of passengers booked and tonnage of goods traffic from the stations on this route within limits of Nagpur district during the year 1958-59: —

 

TABLE No. 4 ,
PASSENGER AND GOODS TRAFFIC FROM VARIOUS STATIONS ON THIS ROUTE DURING THE YEAR 1958-59

Station*
Number of Passengers booked
Tonnage of goods cleared in Metric tons
Chief items of export
1
2
3
4
1. Bharatwada
28,663
19305 (19 tons)
Foodgrains.
2. Kalrneshwar
45,724
3. Metpanira
20,621
4. Kohli
34,069
5. Katol
1,22,868
20321 (2000 tons)
Cotton, cotton seed, foodgrains
6. Kalambha
41,499
20-321 (20 tons)
Miscellaneous
7. Narkhed
1,36,025
1018082 (1002 tons)
Hemp, foodgrains, groundnut.

*All these are exporting stations of oranges. The statistics of orange export are not available

 

Nagpur-Ramtek Route

This broad gauge route runs in common a distance of GH 19.3121 km. (12 miles) from Nagpur with the Nagpur-Howrah, main line and branches off at Kanhan to proceed to Ramtek towards the north. Near Mansar the line bifurcates, one branch leading to Ramtek on the east, while the other, turning to the west, follows a difficult line among the Mansar hills to gain access to the extensive manganese mines in the neighbourhood. The route from Kanhan to Ramtek is 24.1402 km. (15 miles).

This route is under the jurisdiction of the South-Eastern Railway. Local train services are run daily between Nagpur and Ramtek.

Satpuda Railway

The Nagpur-Nagbhir, the Nagpur-Chhindwada and the Saoner-Khapa railway sections passing through this district arc grouped under the Satpuda Railway.( This railway is the combination of three lines formerly known as the Gondia-Chada, Jubbulpore-Gondia and Nagpur-Chhindwara extension. History of Indian Railways: Ministry of Railways, Government of India, P, 29) These sections were constructed between 1904 and 1911. Formerly the Satpuda Railway formed an integral part of the Bengal-Nagpur Railway. After the regrouping of the Indian Railways in 1952 it was regrouped under the South-Eastern Railway.

The Satpuda Railway line was calculated to explore and open out the agricultural and mineral resources of the areas which were practically cut off from the main routes of communications. It was expected to enrich the economy of the area which had a considerable trade potential. It was also meant to provide a means of protection to the inhabitants in times of famine. The Nagpur-Chhindwada line gives an outlet to the numerous manganese mines in this tract, and also connects the Chhindwada. coal-fields with Nagpur.

The Nagpur-Nagbhir section of the Satpuda Railway runs a distance of about 77.0471 km. (47 miles and 7 furlongs) in Nagpur district. It joins Nagpur to the Wardha-Kazipet- Vijayawada route through Chanda. The Nagpur-Chhindwada section covers a distance of about 54.3150 km. (33 miles and 6 furlongs) in this district and connects Nagpur with Chhindwada in Madhya Pradesh. The Saoner-Khapa section which emanates from Saoner on the Nagpur-Chhindwada route is 7.242 km. (four miles and four furlongs) long.

All the sections of this railway are narrow gauge 0.760 metres (2' 6"). The reason for the construction of narrow gauge was that the alignment had to cross ranges of hills and rivers of considerable width. The countryside through which they pass is very uneven at some places. This would have involved heavy capital as well as operating expenses while the estimated income from the railway routes did not present very bright prospects.

The following statement shows the number of passengers s booked and tonnage of goods cleared from important stations of this railway in Nagpur district: —

 

TABLE No. 5
NUMBER OF PASSENGERS BOOKED AND TONNAGE OF GOODS CLEARED FROM IMPORTANT STATIONS IN 1960-61

Station
Number of passengers

*Tonnage of goods (in Metric tons)

1
2
3
1. Motibagh
N.A.
36,090 341
(35,520)
2. Khaperkheda
2,05,127
12,598.401
(12,399)
3. Patansaongi
82,000
557.806
(549)
4. Saoner
2,34,512
40,862.483
(40,217)
5. Khapa
71,811
263,285.988
(2,59,127)
6. Bhiwapur
53,073
1,829-916
(1,801)
7. Umrer
98,966
12,092.456
(11,901)
8. Bamhni
55,554
2,155037
(2,121)
9. Kuhi
1,11,724
11,878.641
(11,691)
10. Titur
60,147
10,486.656
(10,321)
11. Dighori
51,002
1,935.580
(1,905)

*Figures given in brackets are in tons.


ROADS
 
Nagpur occupies a central position in respect of communications since the past. A good number of roads emanate from Nagpur. The following is the description of road routes (The description is based on the account of roads given in the Central Province District Gazetteers—Nagpur District, Volume A, 1908, pages 200-02.) existing by the beginning of this century.

There were five main metalled roads radiating from Nagpur like the spokes of a wheel. The Great Northern road leading to Jubbulpore through Kamptee and Seoni was the finest road in the Province. It was perhaps the only road which was bridged throughout its length (with the exception of the Narmada river). The section in Nagpur district led through Kamptee and Mansar to the borders of Seoni district (now in Madhya Pradesh). There was a magnificent bridge over the Kanhan river near Kamptee, perhaps the finest masonry bridge in India. The bridge had 12 spans of 24.38 metres (80 feet) elliptical arches. The work was completed at a cost of Rs.12l/2 lakhs in the year 1873. The intention of constructing this bridge was to carry the; metre-gauge railway line to Chhattisgad over it, alongside the road, but subsequently a second railway bridge was constructed. This highway bore very high traffic of manganese, timber and forest produce.

A branch road emanated from the Great Northern road at Kamptee which led to Dahegaon on the Nagpur-Chhindwada road at a distance of 16.09 km. (10 miles). Another branch road emanated at Mansar leading for about 8.047 km. (5 miles) to Ramtek.

The Nagpur-Itarsi road and the Nagpur-Chhindwada road ran in common a distance of 37.01 km. (23 miles) up to Saoner. The road length (known as the North-Western road) as far as Saoner was metalled and provided with culverts and causeways. Beyond Saoner, the Itarsi road and the Chhindwada road were also metalled afterwards.

The Nagpur-Chanda road led through Umrer and Bhiwapur. As far as Umrer in the 30th mile (48.28 km.) this road was metalled and bridged throughout with the exception of two rivers in the 12.87 km. and 43.45 km. (8th and 27th miles), respectively. The Nagpur-Kalmeshwar-Katol road was unbridged beyond Kalmeshwar, and traffic in the rains used to suffer from much inconvenience. The Great Eastern road leading through Bhandara and Chhattisgad to Sambalpur in Orissa was metalled and bridged throughout the section in Nagpur district except for the Kanhan river in 33.80 km. (mile number 21). This river was crossed by a temporary bridge in the dry season; but it used to get submerged in the rainy season.

Till 1908 there was no good road communication with the district of Wardha nor with the Berar. The old road to the south through Bori was allowed to sink into complete disrepair. This road was then reconstructed and metalled. After 1908 the construction of a first class road metalled and bridged throughout from Nagpur to Amravati, the then capital of Berar, was undertaken. In addition, a number of road routes aggregating to about 514.99 km. (320 miles) were taken up for construction.

Roads are classified according to their importance into four categories, viz., (i) National Highways, (U) State Highways, (iii) Major District Roads, and (iv) Other District Roads.

The statement below gives the statistics of the four categories of roads in Nagpur district.

 

TABLE No. 6
STATISTICS OF ROADS IN KILOMETRES AND THEIR BREAK UP ACCORDING TO SURFACE

Category of roads
1951
1956
Cement
concrete
Asphalted
Water
bound
macadam
Other
surface
Total
length
Cement
concrete
Asphalted
Water
bound
macadam
Other
surface
Total
length
Total
distance
in Kilometres
by the end of the
Second
Five.Year
Plan
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
 
 
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
Km.
1. National Highways
 

78.858(49.0)

141.4231

(87.7)

..

220.2791

(136.7)

..

214.2441

(133.1)

1.6093

(1.0)

..

215.8531

(134.1)

215.8531

(134.1)

2. State Highways
 
5.4315 (3.3)
148.6635
(92.3)
 
1540950
(95.6)
 
105 0093
(65.2)
77.8525
(48.3)
 
182.8619
(113.5)
201.5703
(125.2)
3. Major District Roads
 
 
86.3009
(53.5)
4.2233
(2.4)
90.3241
(56.1)
41.8429
(26.0)
54.3150
(33.0)
40233
(2.4)

100.1813
(62.2)
238.5853
(148.2)
4. Other District Roads
0.8046
(0.4)
78.6571
(48.7)
38.8304
(24.1)
5.2303
(3.2)
123.5170
(76.6)
1.2070
(0.6)
94.7501
(58.7)
36.2102
(22.4)
120700
(7.4)
144.2379
(89.5)
231.5441
(143.7)
Total
08046
(0.4)
162.9463
(101.2)
415211
(258.0)
9.2537
(5.6)
588.2146
(365.4)
1.2070
(0.6)
455.8463
(283.2)
169.9879
(105.5)
160934
(10.0)
643.1359
(399.5)
8875546
.(551.4)

Figures in brackets indicate miles and furlongs.

 

National highways

National highways are defined as main highways serving predominantly national, as distinct from State needs and purposes, running through the length and breadth of India, and together forming a system connecting capitals of States, major cities, foreign highways, and State highways.

There are two national highways passing through Nagpur district, viz., the Dhulia-Jalgaon-Nagpur-Calcutta road and the Varan ash i-Nagpur-Cape Komorin road. They cross each other at Nagpur.

Dhulia- Jalgaon-Nagpur-Calcutta Road

This highway starts from Dhulia on the Bombay-Agra road, runs through Dhulia, Jalgaon, Buldhana, Akola, Amravati and Wardha districts and enters Nagpur district to run through its entire length in west-east direction through Nagpur and Ramtek tahsils. Leaving Nagpur district it traverses Bhandara and runs beyond to Raipur and to Calcutta. It covers a total distance of 111.246 km. (69 miles and 1 furlong) in Nagpur.

The highway is divided into two sections, viz., Nagpur-Amravati and Nagpur-Bhandara. (i) Nagpur-Amravati road:

The road takes off from 0.8046 km. (mile number 0/4) near the Sitahuldi Police Station of Nagpur and runs due west through Nagpur and Katol tahsils to enter Wardha district at 60.15 km. (mile number 37/3).

It touches the following places in its stretch: —

 
Gondkhairi
(19.711km.)
(12/2)
Bazargaon
(33. 98 km.)
(21/1)
Kondhali
46.87 km.) R.H.( R. H. = Rest House.)
(29/1)
 
 

The road crosses the Wunna river in 23.54 km. (mile 14/5) over a submersible bridge, the Bor in 37.82 km. (mile 23/4) over a high level bridge, again the Bor in 41.84 km. (mile 26) over a narrow high level bridge with two high parapets. It also crosses the Jam in 47.07 km. (mile 29/2) over a high level bridge.

Going from east to west the Kharangna-Kondhali and the Kondhali-Katol-Chincholi State highways emanate from it at 48.28 km. and 49.89 km. (mile 30 and 31), respectively.

This highway has an asphalted surface and is motorable throughout the year except interruption during heavy monsoon at the submersible bridge over the Wunna in 39.63 km. (mile 24/5). (ii) Nagpur-Bhandara-Raipur road:

This road starts from the obelisk at the foot of the Sitabuldi fort, runs towards the east through Nagpur and Ramtek tahsils and enters Bhandara district at 51.10 km. (mile 31/6).

It touches the following places in its stretch—

  Km
Mahalgaon 16-90(10/4)
Vadoda 27.16 (16/7)
Mathni 34 R.H. (21/1)
Mauda 37-62(23/3)
Kharbi 46.66 (29)
 

National Highways

The road crosses the Nag river in 13.88 km. (in mile. 8/5) over a high level-bridge. There is a high level bridge in 17.30 km. (mile 10/6) and a causeway in 24.54 km. (mile 15/2). There is also a submersible bridge across the Kanhan river at 34.80 km.(mile 21/5) where traffic is interrupted in heavy monsoons.

It crosses the Varanashi-Nagpur-Cape Comorin road near Kasturchand Park in Nagpur.

This highway has an asphalted surface and is motorable throughout the year except, interruption at the submersible bridge over the Kanhan during heavy monsoons.

Varanashi-Nagpur-Cape Comorin Road

This national highway (also called the Great Northern road) starts from Varanashi runs through Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh and enters the north-east boundary of Nagpur district. Leaving Nagpur it passes through Ward ha district. It covers a total length of 123.72 km. (76 miles and 7 furlongs) in Nagpur.

It is divided into two sections, viz., Nagpur-Jubbulpore and Nagpur-Bori-Hinganghat.

(i) Nagpur-Jubbulpore road:

The road emanates from the obelisk at the foot of the Sitabuldi fort and runs towards the north-east through Nagpur and Ramtek tahsils until it crosses the border of Seoni district in Madhya Pradesh in 78.054 km. (in mile 48/4). This section covers a length of 78.054 km. (48 miles and 4 furlongs).

It touches the following places in its stretch: —

Kamptee 1448 (9) R.H.
Kanhan 2092 (13)
Amdi 37-01(23)
Mansar 4023 (25
Chorbaoli 49"09 (30/4
Pauni 57-53(35/6)
Sitapur 58-74(36/4)
Deolapar 7343 (45/5)
Manegaon 75.44 (46/7)

The road crosses a nalla in 7.65 km. (in mile 4/6) over a high level bridge, the Kanhan river in 19.71 km. (mile 12/2) over a high level bridge and also the Teha nalla over a high level bridge.

The following roads either take off from it or are crossed by it: -

Point of junction Name of road Class of road
1 2 3
Kms. Miles    
13-48 8/3 Kamptee-Dahegaon O.D.R.*
19-92 12/3 Kanhan to Rly. Station DO
3661 22/6 Amdi-Nargakund DO
40-03 24/7 Mansar-Ramtek M.D.R†

*O. D. R.=Other District Roads

†M.D.R=Major District Roads.

The highway has an asphalted (black-topped) surface and is motorable throughout the year.

 

Nagpur-Bori-Hinganghat road

(ii) Nagpur-Bori-Hinganghat road:

The road starts from the obelisk at the toot of the Sitabuldi fort, runs in the southern direction through Nagpur and Umrer tahsils and leaves for Wardha district at 45.56 km. (mile 28/3). It covers a length of 45.56 km. (28 miles and 3 furlongs).

It touches the following places in its stretch:—

   KM  
Gumgaon 19.51 (12/1)
Dongargaon 20.52 (12/6)
Bori 28.97 (18)
 

 

The Bori-Wardha-Yeotmal State Highway and the Bori-Umrer road (O. D. R.) emanate from this highway at Bori.

The entire length of this road has an asphalted (black-topped) surface and is motorable throughout the year except interruptions twice or thrice a year at the submersible bridge over the Wunna river in 30.17 km. (mile 18/6).

State highways

State highways are defined as all other main trunk or arterial roads of a State connecting other highways, headquarters of districts, cities and serving as main arteries of traffic to and from major roads. They are usually maintained by State Governments and are generally bridged and metalled.

There are five State highways in Nagpur district, viz., Nagpur-Umrer-Chanda road, Nagpur-Chhindwada road, Nagpur-Saoner-Multai road, Kharangna-Kondhali-Katol-Chicholi road and Nagpur-Bori-Wardha-Yeotmal road.

Nagpur-Umrer-Chanda Road

This road emanates from 1.41 km. (mile 0/7) of Nagpur-Bhandara-Raipur road in Nagpur city and traverses the Nagpur land Umrer tahsils in its north to south stretch. Leaving Nagpur (district it runs up to Chanda. The total length of this road in this district is 71.62 km. (44 miles and 4 furlongs).

It touches Umrer at 39.03 km. (mile 24/2) and Bhiwapur in J69.60 km. (mile 43/2). There are rest houses at both these places.

The road crosses the Nag river in 6.04 km. (mile 3/6) over a high level bridge and the Vihirgaon nalla in 12.47 km. (mile 7/6) over a raised causeway. Traffic on this road is interrupted at times of heavy flooding of the nallas at the submersible causeways in 14.89 km. and 16.09 km. (miles 9/2 and 10). In 42.65 km. (mile 26/4) the road crosses the Aam river over a raised causeway. Traffic is interrupted there in heavy rains. In 71.62 km. (mile 44/4) it crosses the Moria river over a submersible bridge where traffic is interrupted only during heavy floods.

The Panchgaon-Kuhi road and the Bori-Umrer road cross it at km. 22.73 and 44.46 (miles 14/1 and 27/5), respectively.

The entire length of this highway is water bound macadam. It is usually motorable except during heavy rains when the traffic may be obstructed for a few hours at causeways or submersible bridges in 12.47 kin., 16.09 km., 42.65 km. and .71.62 km. {i.e., miles 7/6, 10, 26/4 and 44/4).

Nagpur Chhindwada Road

This is an important State highway linking Nagpur city with Chhindwada in Madhya Pradesh. It takes off from the obelisk in Nagpur city and traverses the Nagpur and Saoner tahsils. It runs to the north for about 17.703 km. (11 miles) from Nagpur and then takes a bulge to the north-west up to the border of the district. The total length of this road in Nagpur district is 49.89 km. (31 miles).

It touches the following places in its stretch:—

  kms  
Mahadule 11.27 (7)
Dahegaon 16.09 (10)
Pipla 18.51 (11/4) R.H.
Patansaongi 24.14 (15)
Saoner 36.00 (22/3) R.H
Khurjgaon 40.23 (25)
Kelod 46.67 (29)

In 4.43 km. (mile 2/6) the road crosses Ghorazhari nalla over a causeway which sometimes holds up traffic for a few hours on rainy days. It then crosses in 12.47 km. (mile 7/6) a nalla over a raised causeway and the Kolar river in 13.88 km. (mile 8/5) over a submersible bridge which may also hold up traffic for a few hours on days of heavy rains. It crosses Khurjgaon nalia over a submersible bridge in 40.23 km. (mile 24/8) and a small nalla over a raised causeway in 45.26 km. (mile 28/1). At both these places traffic is held up at times during rainy season.

The following roads either take off from it or are crossed By it:—

Place of junction
Name of road
Class of road
1
2
3
Kms
16.89(10/4)
Kamptee-Dahegaon
O.D.R
24.94(15/4)
Khapa-Patansaongi
Do
36.00 (22/3)
Saoner-Multai
S. H.

The entire length of this highway is asphalted (black-topped) and motorable throughout the year except in heavy rains when traffic is obstructed at 4.43 km. (mile 2/6), 12.47 km. (mile 7/6), 13.88 km. (mile 8/5), and 40.23 km. (mile 24/8) and 46.26 km. (mile 28/6).j

Nagpur-Saoner-Multai Road

This road runs in common with the Nagpur-Chhindwada road up to Saoner and emanates from the latter at Saoner. It runs towards the north-west up to 62.56 km. (mile 38/7) where it enters Chhindwada district. It terminates at Multai in Betul district of Madhya Pradesh. The length of this road from Nagpur to Saoner is 36.41 km. (22 miles and 5 furlongs) and from Saoner to Nagpur district border 26.1518 km. (16 miles and 2 furlongs). Thus its total length in Nagpur district is 26.1518 km. (16/2 furlongs).

It touches Kursapar in 59.34 km. (mile 36/7).

Traffic over this road is obstructed for a few hours on days' of heavy rain at 49.0849 km. (miles 30/4) and 58.34 km. (mile .36/2) where there are causeways.

No road either takes oft from it or is crossed by it. The road has an asphalted (black-topped) surface and is motorable throughout the year except the traffic obstructions as noted above.

Kharangna- Kondhali- Katol-Chincholi Road

This highway starts from Kharangna in Wardha running towards the north-east up to Kondhali (in Nagpur) on the Nagpur-Amravati road. From Kondhali onwards it runs in common for a little distance with the Nagpur-Amravati road and then finds its way to the north (with a slight bulge to the north-east) via Katol and Sawargaon. Leaving Nagpur district border it enters Chhindwada. The Kondhali to Sawargaon section is a Class I metalled road.

The distance at present is measured both ways from Katol. The length from Wardha-Nagpur border to Katol is 20.72 km. (12 miles and 7 furlongs) and from Katol to Nagpur-Chhindwada border is 24.1402 km. (15 miles).

There are no major river crossings on this road. The Nagpur-Katol-Jalalkheda road (M. D. R.) (M.D.R.=Major District Road.) crosses it at Katol.

The section from Kondhali to Sawargaon only is motorable throughout the year.

This State highway runs in common with the Nagpur-Bori-Hinganghat National Highway up to Bori, 28.969 km. (in mile 18) and emanates from it to lead towards the south-west border of the district. It leaves Nagpur district at 44.46 km. (mile 27/5) and further traverses the Wardha and the Yeotmal districts. It covers a length of 15.49 km. (9 miles and 5 furlongs) in Nagpur.

It does not touch any important place nor does it cross any road.

The entire length is asphalted (black-topped) and is motorable throughout the year.

Major District Roads

Major District Roads are roughly of the same specifications as State highways except that they may not be asphalted or fully bridged. These roads connect important centres of trade and commerce with railways and highways.

The Major District Roads in this district are: (i) Nagpur-Mansar-Ramtek-Tumsar-Balaghat road, (ii) Nagpur-Katol-Jalal-kheda road and (iii) Narkhed-Mowad road.

Nagpur- Mansar- Ramtek-Tumsar-Balaghat -Road

The road runs in common with the Nagpur-Jubbulpore National Highway (Great Northern road) from Nagpur city to Mansar. It emanates from the latter at Mansar in 40.23 km. (mile 25), runs to the east to cross the boundary of Nagpur district and traverses the Bhandara district. The length of this road from Mansar to the district border is 27.76 km. (17 miles and 2 furlongs). A portion of the road from Khindsi to the district border is under construction.

It touches Ramtek in 46.67 km. (mile 29) and Khindsi in 53.10 km. (mile 33).There is a rest-house at Mansar.

No important road takes off from it or is crossed by it.

The surface of this road up to Khindsi [53.10 km- (mile 33)] is asphalted (black-topped). The road is motorable throughout the year.

Nagpur- Katol- Jalalkheda Road

The road starts from the obelisk at the foot of the Sitabuldi fort at Nagpur, runs towards the west through Nagpur and Katol tahsils and enters Amravati district at 80.27 km. (mile 49/7). Its length in Nagpur district is 80.2661 km. (49 miles and 7 furlongs).

It touches the following places in its stretch: —

  Km  
Kalmeshwar 19.91 (12/3) R.H
Dorli 36.21 (22/4) R.H
Katol 57.53 (35/6) R.H
Jalalkheda 79.05 (49/1) R.H

The road crosses the Kalmeshwar nalla in 19.51 km. (mile 12/1) over a raised causeway, the Ghorad in 22.73 km. (mile 14/1) over a raised causeway, the Jamb river in 52.91 km. (mile 32/7) over a raised causeway and the Lendi nalla in 55.12 km. (mile 34/2) over a raised causeway. At all these causeways, traffic is held up for a few hours on rainy days. It also crosses the Jam river. There is a submersible bridge in 77.65 km. (mile 48/2).

It crosses the Kharangna-Kondhali-Katol-Chicholi State Highway at 57.53 km. (mile 35/6) near Katol. The Kohli-Mohpa road; emanates from it at 32.79 km. (mile 20/3).

The entire length of this road is water bound macadam. It is motorable throughout the year except in heavy rains when traffic is obstructed twice or thrice in a year at the causeways at 22.73, 52.91, 55.12 and 77.65 km. (mile numbers 14/1, 32/7, 34/2 and 48/2).

Narkhed- Mowad Road

The road starts from Narkhed, a railway station on the Nagpur- Itarsi-Delhi railway route, and runs through Katol tahsil towards, the west to Mowad. The entire length of the road is 9.857 km. (6 miles and a furlong).

It touches Belona in 5.0291 km. (mile 3/1). It has a metalled surface and is motorable throughout the year.

Other District Roads

Other District Roads are usually like Major District Roads, except that they are subject to more frequent interruptions to traffic during the rains. They are designed to serve tahsil places and market centres. They are generally unmetalled and have murum surface.

 

The following are the roads belonging to this category: —

(i) Kamptee-Dahegaon branch road, (ii) Tharsa Railway Station road, (iii) Khapa-Patansaongi road, (iv) Khapa Railway Station road, (v) Pardi-Bagadganj road, (vi) Amdi-Naikund road, (vii) Khapa-Kodegaon road, (viii) Dumri Khurd Railway Station road, (ix) Kanhan Railway Station road, (x) Kohli-Mohpa road and (xi) Bori-Umrer road.

Kamptee-Dahegaon Road

The road emanates from 13.48 km. (mile 8/3) of Nagpur-Jubbulpore road (Great Northern road) near Christ Church at Kamptee and runs to the north-west through Nagpur tahsil. It joins the Nagpur-Chhindwada road in 16.90 km. (mile 10/4) at Dahegaon. The total length of this road is 14.89 km. (9 miles and 2 furlongs). The road affords direct communication from Kamptee to Chhindwada.
It touches Khaparkheda in 12.87 km. (mile 8) and Dahegaon in i6.90 km. (mile 10/4).

It crosses the Kolar river in 8.25 km. (mile 5/1) with a sub mersible bridge and a nalla in 15.28 km. (mile 9/4) over a causeway.

It joins the Nagpur-Jubbulpore road to the Nagpur-Chhindwada road.

The entire length of this road is asphalted (black-topped) and is motorable throughout the year except interruptions at the Kolar river.

Tharsa Railway Station Road

This road joins Tharsa village to the Tharsa railway station On the Nagpur-Howrah railway route. The total length of this road is 5.23 km. (3 miles and 2 furlongs) and it traverses only the Ramtek tahsil.

In its stretch it does not touch any place nor does it cross any road.

It is motorable throughout the year except in times of heavy rains.

Khapa- Patansaongi Road

The road starts from Patansaongi and runs to.the north-west up to Khapa. It connects Khapa with the Nagpur-Chhindwada road. Its total length is 10.86 km. (6 miles and 6 furlongs).

It has a metalled surface and is motorable throughout the year except in heavy rains. Traffic is obstructed at a causeway in 9.05 km. (mile 5/5).

Khapa Railway Station

It serves traffic to the Khapa railway station. It does not touch any place nor are there any crossings on it. It has an asphalted (black-topped) surface and is motorable throughout the year.

Pardi-Bagadganj Road

The road starts from the end of the Nagpur Corporation road limit near Gangabai Ghat in Nagpur city and runs towards the east till it joins the Nagpur-Bhandara (Great Eastern) road in 7.85 km. (mile 4/7) near Pardi. The total length of this road is 3.22 km. (2 miles).

It is a, class I asphalted (black-topped) road and is motorable throughout the year.

 

This road starts from 36.61 km. (mile 22/6) of the Great; Northern road and runs towards the west up to Naikund in Ramtek tahsil. The total length of this road is 5.23 km. (3 miles and 2 furlongs).

Amdi-Naikund Road

It does not touch any place nor does any road emanate from it. It has a metalled surface and is motorable throughout the year.

Khapa- Kodegaon Road

The road starts from Khapa in Ramtek tahsil and runs a distance of 2.61 km. (1 mile and 5 furlongs) up to Kodegaon.
It does not touch any village nor does any road cross it. There is no bridge on it. It is motorable only in the fair-weather season.

Dumri-Khurd Railway Station Road

This feeder road is only 6035 km. (3 furlongs) in length and serves traffic to Dumri railway station on the South-Eastern; Railway route. It also meets the Great Northern road in 30.37 km. (mile 18/7). It is motorable throughout the year.

Kanhan Railway Station Road

This feeder road is only 2011km. (1furlong) in length and serves traffic to Kanhan station on the Nagpur-Howrah railway route. It is a class I road and is motorable throughout the year.

Kohli-Mohpa Road

This road starts from Kohli at 32.79 km. (mile 20/3) of the Nagpur-Katol-Jalalkheda road and runs to the north up to Mohpa. Total length of this road is 6.44 km. (4 miles and a furlong).

It does not touch any place nor does any road cross it. It is motorable throughout the year.

Bori-Umrer Road

The road starts from Bori railway station on the Bombay-Bhusawal-Nagpur line and runs towards the south-east. It traverses the Nagpur and Umrer tahsils. From Bori railway station up to 24.14 km. (mile 15) it is a Class II road and from 24.14 km. (mile 15) up to Umrer it is a Class I road. Its total length is 34.60 km. (21 miles and 4 furlongs).

It touches Makardhokda in 24.14 km. (mile 15). Going from west to east it joins the Nagpur-Umrer-Chanda road near Umrer, There is no major bridge over this road.

It has a metalled surface and is motorable throughout the year, except during heavy rains.

Roads in Towns

The expansive city of Nagpur has a number of wide, well- planned and well-constructed roads. In keeping with the grandeur and importance of the city, the squares and chauks are nicely planned and roads arc developed in a proper perspective. Mention may be made of the Variety Chauk in Sitabuldi from where a number of roads emanate.

Roads in Towns

The programme of road development received a fillip after the establishment of the Nagpur Municipal Corporation in 1951.The asphalting of roads received the active attention of the Corporation. The Nagpur Improvement Trust has been playing a very significant role in bringing about an aesthetic development of the city. (A detailed description of the same may be found in Chapter 19). The Nagpur Municipal Corporation has under its control roads of the length of over 275 km. (171 miles). Of this, a length of about 11.26 km. (7 miles) is cement concrete, 114.26 km. (71 miles) is asphalted, 122.31 km. (76 miles) is metalled and 25.74 km. (16 miles) is unmetalled. Besides the roads under the Corporation, a number of highways, whiGh emanate from the Sitabuldi, pass through the city. These highways are maintained by the Buildings and Communications department of the State Government.

As regards the other towns in Nagpur district, roads are not developed with a perspective of town planning. The municipal authorities cannot afford to spend substantially on road development. The following statement shows the length of roads in kilometres under the charge of the respective municipalities:

 
Towns
Length
Metalled
Unmetalled
Total
1
2
3
km
km
km
Ramtek
2.4139
(1-4)*
N.A
Khapa
3.2187
(2-0)
3.2187
(2.0)*
6.4374
(4.0)*
Kamptee
14.4841
(9-0)
2.4139
(1-4)
16.8974
(10-4)
Umrer
8.2478
(3-1)
16.8980
(10-4)
25.146
(15-5)
Saoner
4.0233
(2-4)
2.4139
(1-4)
6.4374
(4-0)
Mohpa
0.8046
(0-4)
4.2246
(2-5)
5.0291
(3-1)

*Figures in miles and furlongs.

 
 
BRIDGES
 
With a network of road communication in the district, a number of river crossings have bridges. The old Gazetteer of Nagpur district makes a special mention of the bridge over the Great Northern road near Kamptee: " There is a magnificent bridge over, the Kanhan river near Kamptee, perhaps the finest masonry bridge in India. It consists of 12 spans or 24.38 metres (80 feet) elliptical arches. The work was completed at a cost of Rs.12 1/2 lakhs in the year 1873 When this bridge was made it was intended to carry the metre-gauge railway line to Chhattisgarh over it, alongside the road, but subsequently a second railway bridge was constructed".†( Central Provinces District Gazetteers, Nagpur District, Vol. A, 1908, page 200.) The Great Northern road, the Nagpur-Chhindwada road, the Nagpur-Saoner-Multai road, the Great Eastern road, etc., were bridged at almost all important river crossings by that time.

Since the publication of the Nagpur District Gazetteer (1908) a number of major bridges, submersible bridges and causeways have been constructed. The statement below gives the locational and structural particulars of the major bridges, i.e., bridges having a length of 30.48 metres (100') or above.

 

TABLE NO 7

STATEMENT OF MAJOR BRIDGES IN NAGPUR DISTRICT

S.No
Name of river
and bridge
Name of
road
Nearby
town or
village
Distance
No. of spans
and length
Width of roadway
Average height of bridge
Type of construction
Year of construction
Remarks
1
2
3
4
5
6
7 8 9 10
11
1 Bor nalla: Segmental sub
mersible arch bridge.
Nagpur-Amravati road.
 
390266 km
(mile 24/2)
4 spans of 30' each
9.1440 m.
3.6576 m. (12') 3'315 m. (10'-10 1/2)  Arch type stone masonry construction. 1914.15 Existing bridge.
2 Wana river: Seg mental sub- mersible arch bridge.
Nagpur-Bori-
Hinganghat
road.
Bori
30-1752 km
(mile 18/6)

7 spans of 30' each.
9.1440 m.
3.6576 m. (12') 5.9436 m. (19'-6"). Do. 1929.31 Do.
3 Nag river: Segmental arch high
level bridge.
Nagpur-Umrer-
Chanda road.
Nagpur
60350 km.
(mile 3/6)
5 spans—
2 of 35'each,10.6680 rr. 2 of 40' each,
12.192 m. 1 of 45;
13.176. Total 195
59.436.
3.6576 m. (12') 3.124 m. (10'-3') Do. 1890 Do.
4 Kalamna Pipla nalla: Submersible arch bridge.
Do.
 
14.8864 km.
(mile 9/2)
4 spans of 30' each.
9.1440 m.
3.6576 m. (12') 3.124 m. (10'.3"). Do. 1891 Do.
5 Virgaon nalla:Raised causeway.
Do.
16.0934 km.
(mile 10)
 
5 spans of 30' each.
9'1440 m.
3.6576 m. (12') 3.124 m. (10'-3"). Do. Not known Do.
6 Aam river : Submersible bridge.
 

42.6475 km.
(mile 26/4)
Not known.
3.6576 m. , (12'). 4.2672 m. (14'). R.C.C. slab construction.
Do Raised causeway is existing; submersible bridge is planned to be constructed.
7 Mora river: Seg- mental sub- mersible arch bridge.
Do.
 
71.6156 km.
(mile 44/4)
3 spans oi 24'
each. 7.3152 m.
3.6576 m. 1 (12). 2.464 m. (8'-7 1/2"). Stone masonry Not known Existing bridge..
8 Jam river: Submersible bridge.

Nagpur-Katol-
Jalalkheda road.
 
77.6513 km.
(mile 48/2)
7 spans of 35' each.
10.6680 m.
3.6576 m. (12') 4.8768 m. (16'). R.C.C. slab flat bridge. Do. Under construction.
9 Kanhan river
Nagpur-Bhan- dara-Calcutta,
road.
Mathni
34.8021 km.
(mile 21/5)
27 spares of 26.3" each. 8.001 m.
4.5720 m. (15') 3.3528 m. (11') Sand stone seg.mental arch bridge. Do. Existing magnificent and well.built submersible bridge.
10 Kanhan river
Nagpur-Jubbul-
pore road.
Kanhan
19.7144 km.
(mile 12/2)

12 spans of 12.6"each. 3. 811 m.
6.4008 m. (210. 3.3528 m. (11') Sand stone arch elliptical bridge. Do. Existing magnificent and well.built high level bridge.
11 Kolar river
Nagpur-Chhind-
wada road.
Mahadulla
13.8807 km.
(mile 8/5)
9 spans of 30' each.
9.1440 rr,
3.8100 m. (12'.6'0. 2.4384 m. (8') Sand stone seg.mental arch bridge. Do. Existing submersible bridge.

 

PUBLIC TRANSPORT
 
State Transport

The history of passenger transport of an organised character s can be traced to the year 1942 when Messrs. Mechanical Transport Ltd. started transport of passengers. This company sponsored another company, viz., The Nagpur Omnibus Company in 1943 under its Managing Agency. In 1945, the name of the company was changed to The Provincial Transport Company Ltd. and Messrs. Mechanical Transport continued to be the Managing Agents. They, however, surrendered its Managing Agency to the Government in 1946. The Government assumed the managing agency rights and reconstituted the Board of Directors. The company continued to function as a joint stock company under the Indian Companies Act, 1936, up to 31st August 1955, when it was brought under government management as a going concern and named as ' The Provincial Transport Services (Under Government Ownership)'.

In order to co-ordinate the activities and organisation of the three State Transport organisations, the Bombay State Road Transport Corporation, the Provincial Transport Services and the Marathwada State Transport were merged into a single corporation, the Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation, Bombay, in July 1961. As such, the Provincial Transport Services became an integral part of the Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation from July 1961.

Extent Of Operations

 

After the nationalisation of the Undertaking in 1955 the following routes passing through Nagpur district were operated: —

Name of route
Distance
No. of return
trips
Distance covered daily
(in Km.)
1
2
3
4
5
6
 
Kms
Miles
Kms
Miles
1 Nagpur-Jubbulpore
273.588
170
6
321.869
200
2 Nagpur-Chhapara
162.544
101
1
325-087
202
3 Nagpur-Seoni
127.138
79
2
508-55
316
4 Nagpur-Waiaseoni
220.480
137
1
440.960
274
5 Nagpur-Rajnandgaon
212.433
132
1
424.867
264
6 Nagpur-Dcori
140.013
87
2
560.05
348
7 Nagpur-Saundad ..
111.044
69
2
444.179
276
8 Nagpur-Sakoli
99.779
62
3
598.68
372
9 Nagpur-Gondia
159.325
99
3
955.95
594
10 Nagpur-Bhandara
61.155
38
3
366.930
228
11 Nagpur-Mouda
35.4056
22
2
141.622
88
12 Nagpur-Yavatmal
144.841
90
4
1,158.73
720
13 Nagpur-Hinganghat
77.249
48
8
1,235.98
768
14 Nagpur-Wardha
77.249
48
4
617099
384
15 Nagpur-Chanda (via Warora)
154.497
96
2
617.99
384
16 Nagpur-Warora
109.435
68
2
437.742
272
 

Subsequently, with the reorganisation of States in November 1956, there was some reshuffling of routes between this Undertaking and the Central Provinces Transport Services (U. G. O.) and accordingly some routes, viz., Nagpur-Jubbulpore, Nagpur-Seoni, Nagpur-Chhapara were transferred to the Central Provinces Transport Services, Jubbulpore. In return this Undertaking took over the routes falling in Nagpur, Amravati, Arvi and Jalalkheda sections from the Central Provinces Transport Services. During the year 1958-59 services were also extended to Ramtek and Kamptee.

The Undertaking (The Undertaking is operating the Services in Nagpur, Bhandara, Wardha, Chanda, Amravati and Yeotmal districts at present (January 1961). The daily service distance operated by the Undertaking is 40,983*45 km. (25,466 miles) in rural areas and 4,66709 km. (2,900 miles) in Nagpur city. Of the total of 92 routes operated by it in rural areas, 35 radiate from Nagpur city and traverse the Nagpur district. It has a fleet of 315 well-built buses. On an average 214 vehicles are on the road daily. Of the 315 vehicles, 131areofthe Mercedes Benz brand.'

During 1959-60 the Undertaking's buses carried 1,58,11,797 passengers The daily average number of passengers carried during the year worked out to 43,320.) operated a route of 1287.48 km. (mileage of about 800) per day in Nagpur city at this stage.

.There has been a gradual increase in the operations of Nagpur city passenger services. By January 1961 the Undertaking was operating routes of 4,667.09 km. (2,900 miles) daily in Nagpur city

The following statement gives the route distance and number of return trips over the State Transport routes in Nagpur district as in 1960.

 

TABLE No. 8
STATE TRANSPORT ROUTES IN NAGPUR DISTRICT AS IN DECEMBER 1960.

Serial
No.
Name of the route
Route distance
Number of return trips
1
2
3
4
5
1 Nagpur- Amravati*
154.497
96
13
2 Nagpur-Arvi*
111.045
69
3
3 Nagpur-Kondhali..
48.2803
30
2
4 Nagpur-Jalalkbeda
78.858
49
7
5 Nagpur-Mohpa
38.624
24
5
6 Nagpur-Patansaongi
28.9682
18
2
7 Nagpur-Bazargaon
33.796
21
1
8 Nagpur-Ramtek
48.2803
30
7
9 Nagpur-Kamptee
16.0934
10
14
10 Nagpur-Kanhan
20.9215
13
2
11 Nagpur-Seoni*
127.138
79
2
12 Nagpur-Rajriandgaon*
212.432
132
1
13 Nagpur-Waraseoni*
220.480
137
1
14 Nagpur-Gondia*
159.325
99
3
15 Nagpur-Bhandara*
61.155
38
8
16 Nagpur-Soundad*
111.045
69
2
17 Nagpur-Sakoli*
99.779
62
1
18 Nagpur-Deori*
140.013
87
2
19 Nagpur-Mouda
35.405
22
2
20 Nagpur-Paradsinga (via Kelod)
56.327
35
1
21 Nagpur-Yeotmal*
144.841
90
5
22 Nagpur- Hinganghat*
77.249
48
8
23 Nagpur-Wardha*
77.249
48
4
24 Nagpur-Chanda {via Warora)*.
154.497
96
2
25 Is agpur-Chanda {via Umrer)
201.168
125
1
26 Nagpur-Khapa
38.6243
24
5
27 Nagpur-Khaparkheda
20.9215
13
1
28 Nagpur-Warora*
109.435
68
1
29 Nagpur.-Pipla
82.077
51
1
30 Nagpur-Katol
56.327
35
6
31 Nagpur-Kalmeshwar
20.9215
13
4
32 Nagpur-Jaurwada
72.420
45
1
33 Katol-Sawargaon
14.4841
9
5
34 Katol-Jalalkheda
22.5308
14
6
35 Kondhali-Katol
17.7028
11
5

*These are inter-district routes.

 

Amenities to passengers

The Undertaking has constructed a central bus station near the Nagpur Railway Station. The Central bus station is equipped with potable water and sanitary arrangements, parcel and cloakrooms, canteens, waiting hall, etc. The central bus station building was extended by a renovated construction in 1958-59. A city bus terminus has recently been constructed at Sitabuldi. At important places sheds have been provided in Nagpur city.

Well-built and ventilated buses are provided. Facilities of reservation of seats, advance booking, etc., are available to the passengers. As per provisions of the Motor Vehicles Act first- aid boxes are maintained in all the buses.

 

State Transport Depots

There are four depots at Nagpur serving the Nagpur-Amravati, Nagpur-Bhandara, Nagpur-Wardha and Nagpur City Bus services. Besides these four depots, there is a central workshop situated at Ghat Road, Nagpur, where body-building and reconditioning of motor vehicles are carried out. There arc also workshops attached to each of the above depots where running repairs are carried out.

Private Passenger Transport

Though a majority of the passenger transport services have been nationalised and brought under the operations of the Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation, a few routes are still allowed to be served by private owners of transport vehicles. Some of the routes are left exclusively for the private owners whereas on a few routes they share the passenger traffic with the State Transport buses.

The services rendered by these private buses are not up to the mark. Rules regarding safety of passengers, comfort and convenience are seldom observed. Overcrowding in buses is a frequent occurrence. Regularity is not observed. Amenities to passengers are rarely made available. No attempts are made to improve the service conditions of the staff. They are poorly paid and overworked.

A list of names of some of the private owners of passenger buses is given here.—

1. Premsewa Regular Motor Service, Nagpur.
2. S. H. Transport Co., Nagpur.
3. Syndicate Transport Co. (Private Ltd.), Nagpur.
4. Nagpur District Transport Co., Nagpur.
5. Samarth Transport Co., Nagpur.
6. Natwar Transport Co., Nagpur.
7. C. P. Sikh R. M. S., Nagpur.
8. New Loksewa Motor Service, Nagpur.
9. Saroj Transport Co., Nagpur.
10. Laxmi Motor Service, Nagpur.
11. Jaiswal Transport Co., Khapa.
12. Commercial Transport Co., Khapa.
13. National Transport Co., Khapa.
14. Rai Transport Service, Narkhed.
15. Syed Umarali Syed Amarali, Narkhed.
16. Godhankar Bandhu Motor Service, Mowad.
17. Sk. Chhotu Sk. Madar, Nagpur.

 
RURAL TRANSPORT
 
 

It is by far widely known that India is an underdeveloped country and that the facilities of transport in the rural areas are far from satisfactory. The roads are usually unmetalled and sometimes not usable for even" cart traffic in the rainy season. However, during the last two decades considerable progress has been achieved and several schemes of road development are under way.

Although transport facilities in the rural areas of India are inadequate, it should be mentioned that Nagpur district enjoys better facilities than many other districts of Maharashtra. A number of highways, major roads and railway routes emanate from Nagpur. Naturally enough they touch numerous villages and cater to the transport needs of most of the interior tracts of the district. Many approach roads have lately been developed. Thus, many motorable roads are available to the rural areas of this district.

It may further be noted that on most of the motorable roads the State Transport authorities are running buses. Since the nationalisation of the transport undertaking the facilities of bus transport have been carried to almost all corners of the district. (The Directory of Villages and Towns given at the end of this Volume also gives the nearest bus stand and the nearest railway station useful to each village in this district.)

The railway routes, viz., Bombay-Nagpur-Howrah, Nagpur- Itarsi, Nagpur-Ramtek, Nagpur-Chanda, Nagpur-Chhindwada. etc., which emanate from Nagpur cater to the transport needs of the. rural tracts. Moreover, approach roads from railway stations have lately been developed, with the result that the problem of rural transport has been eased considerably , in Nagpur district.

 
 
AIR TRANSPORT
 
The Nagpur Airport, situated at Sonegaon, was commissioned during the First World War in 1917-18. It is centrally situated and commands an air zone over a wide area in Central India. It commands direct air communications with the metropolitan cities, namely, Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta and Madras. Passenger and air mails traffic at this airport is served by the daily night air services of the Indian Airlines Corporation running to rind from Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta and Madras.

The old buildings at the airport were renovated during he Second World War. Realising the national importance of air communications and brisk traffic at the airport new buildings were constructed in 1953. The new buildings give an impress of massive modern architecture and imposing appearance. Decent facilities of refreshment, retiring rooms, rest-rooms, book stalls, visitors galleries, etc., are provided there. The Observatory is on the second floor. The premises of the airport command an expanse of 323.749 hectares (800 acres) of land.

The Central Meteorological Department building is situated: in the vicinity of this airport. Residential quarters for the staff are built a little further.

The Senior Aerodrome Officer is in charge of this airport, and he is assisted by a Communications Officer, Aircraft Engineer and others.

 
TOURIST FACILITIES

 

The central position of Nagpur in Central India has lent it considerable importance as a tourists' place. The reasons for heavy tourist traffic to Nagpur are cited below. The tics of Nagpur with the Vidarbha region and the tracts in Madhya Pradesh arc very old. Nagpur has been perhaps the most important centre of trade and commerce, industries, mining, communication and culture in the Central India. It was also the capital of the former Madhya Pradesh State and is now the second capital of Maharashtra. The Nagpur University is located at Nagpur and a number of colleges and research institutes have adorned this city. Some of the areas surrounding Nagpur city are rich in minerals and coal deposits. Naturally the traffic to the city has gone up.

Consequently there has been a flush of tourists traffic to Nagpur. It is gratifying to note that a number of cosmopolitan hotels, modern, lodging and boarding houses, clubs, etc have sprang up in the Civil Lines, Sadar and Sitabuldi areas. The Mount Hotel, the Sham Hotel and the Raj Hotel are the famous lodging houses in Nagpur City. There are dharmashalas run; and maintained by charitable institutions.

The Government of Maharashtra have also maintained in the (Civil Lines two very nice rest-houses for Members of the Legislative Assembly. They are furnished with all modern facilities. Primarily these rest-houses are meant for Members of the Legislature and Government Officers on duty. But they are also given for occupation to private tourists and marriage parties. The Government have also maintained a rest-house near Kasturchand Park.

Inspection bungalows and rest-houses have been provided for officers on duty at the following towns and villages: Bhiwapur, Botehari, Chorbaoli, Deolapar, Ghatpendri, Kalmeshwar, Kamptee, Katol, Khai, Khindsi, Kholdboda, Kondhali, Loh-dongri, Mansar, Mauda, Bagalwadi, Nagpur, Pipla, Salaighat, Saoner, Sillari, Surera, Umrer and Virsee.

 

POST OFFICES
 
 

The building of the General Post Office is located in Civil Pines, Nagpur. In Nagpur city itself there are combined post offices at Ajni, Assa House, Bezonbagh, Cotton Market, Craddock Market, Craddock Town, Dhantoli, Giri Peth, Hitvada, Indora, Jaripatka, Khare Town, Mahal, Medical College, Mohan Nagar, Sadar Bazar, Nagpur Times. Nctaji Market, New Colony and Sitabuldi. There are also combined offices at the following places in the district: —

Nagpur Air Port, Bhiwapur, Kalmeshwar, Kamptee, Kamptee Bazar, Katol, Khapa, Narkhed, Pauni, Ramtek, Saoner, Umrer and Umrer Bazar.

There are Branch Post Offices at—

Amgaon Deoli, Ashta, Bamni (Nagpur), Bazargaon Bela (Nagpur), Bhandewadi, Bhugaon (Nagpur), Borde, Bori, Champa, Deolapar, Deolikalbandc, Bhamne, Dhanla, Dighori-kale, Gondkhairi, Gowari, Gumgaon, Gumthala (Nagpur), Heora, Hingna, Kalamna, Kandri (Nagpur), Kanholi, Kawdas, Khapri, Khursapar, Kohli, Kondhali, Mahadulla (Nagpur), Mahuli, Mahurzari, Mansar, Masod, Mohgaon, Mohpa,Mouda, Nawegaon, Pachgaon, Paoni (Ramtek), Phetri, Pipla (Nagpur), Piplakinkheda, Pipra, Ridhora (Nagpur), Sakkar- dhara, Salaidhaba, Sp'saigodhni, Shivasonga, Takalghat, Umriwagh (Nagpur), Vyahad, Waoddhamna, Wadooda, Bornala, Ganjakhet*, Ganji Peth*, Gokulpeth*, Maskasath*. Mominpura*, Nayapura*, Pachpaoli*, Shankarnagar*, Shradhanand Peth*, Tinnal*, Tilak Statue*, Borgaon (Dhurkheda), Dhapewada, Ghorad, Ubali, Uparwahi, Aroli, Bina, Chacher, Gondegaon, Hingna Barabhai, Kamhanpipri, Khat, Kondhamendhi, Nimbakheda, Rewral, Salwa (Kamptee), Tarsa, Kamptee Camp, Ambada, Bharsing, Bishnoor. Dawsa, Dhawalapur, Digra Buzruk, Dorli (Bhandwalkar), Dorli Buzruk, Erla, Jalalkbeda, Kacharisaonga, Khapa (Katol), Sawargaon, Ladgaon, Lohari saonga, Mendhla, Metpanjra, Murti, Paradsinga, Ridhora (Katol), Sindi, Thadipauni, Thugaondev, Yenwa, Zilpa, Khamla, Badegaon, Khubala, Kodegaon, Kothulna, Pipla, Khaperkheda, Belona, Khairgaon, Kharsoli, Mowar Tinkheda,' Yenikoni, Amgaon (Pauni), Kurza, Sawarla, Dahegaon Joshi; Kachurwahi, Khandala (Ramtek), Mahadulla (Ramtek), Musejwadi, Nagardhan, Parseoni, Adasa, Bichwa, Gaimukhnanda Kelod, Khairi (Dhalgaon), Khangaon, Malegaon, Mangsa Patansaongi, Pipla (Kcolram), Takli, Telgaon, Telgaon Kamptee, Umrinanda (Saoner), Waki, Adam, Bamhni (Umrer); Bhuyar, Channa, Dawha (Umrer), Dodma, Dongarmandhaj Fegad, Gothangaon, Jaoli, Jiwanapur, Kargaon, Kuhi, Makar. dhokda, Mondhol, Mangnul, Marni, Pachkhcdi, Rajola, Salwa (Umrer), Tarna, Thutanbori, Titur, Udasa and Veltur, ( * These post offices are in Nagpur City.)

Thus there are 33 Combined Offices and 173 Branch Post Offices in this district. On an average one Post Office serves eight to nine villages.

 

 

RADIO COMMUNICATIONS

 
 

All India Radio Nagpur

There is an All India Radio (Akashvani) Station at Nagpur. It is situated in Civil Lines, Nagpur. A wing of the building is converted into a studio block whereas the remaining portion of the building is utilised for office purposes. The buildings in which the transmitter and receiving centre of the All India Radio are located are specially constructed for the purpose. Both these centres are situated at a considerable distance from the city. The All India Radio, Nagpur, is equipped with a 10 K.W Medium Wave Westinghouse transmitter of 10 HV-1 type. The transmitter has got a self radiating mast of 106.68 metres (350 feet) height. It operates on a frequency of 590 Kc, i.e, 508.5 metres. The zonal limit of the transmitter extends over the entire Vidarbha region. It has a primary service area of about 160.93 km. (100 miles) radius.

The studios are situated at a central place and are easily approachable. Convenience of the artists and others who arc required to attend the studios for their broadcasts is kept in view. In the studio-block there are the (i) Music Studio, (ii) Talks Studio and (iii) Gramo Studio. The facilities provided at this Station are just sufficient to carry out the day-to-day programmes meant for this region.

Broadcasting Programmes

Music forms a major part of the programmes of the All India Radio, Nagpur. A proper proportion is maintained between the broadcasts of classical and light music. Concerts of classical music are broadcast at fixed intervals, sometimes before invited audiences. The artists of the zone who have been auditioned and graded by the Panel constituted specially for the purpose are given engagements for broadcast. They belong mainly to two categories, viz., vocalists and instrumentalists. Film songs are also broadcast.

Besides music, news, talks, plays and allied features are relayed daily. Talks form an important part of these programmes while plays form another part. The plays are very popular with the listeners. There are many programmes belonging to special categories generally known as Special Audience Programmes. They are the rural programmes, industrial programmes, school broadcasts, women's programmes, children's programmes, etc. The formation of listeners clubs especially in women's and children's programmes with a view to popularising organised listening is an important feature. News bulletins in English, Hindi and Marathi are relayed from Delhi at specified intervals every day. National programmes of music, plays, operas and talks are relayed from Delhi. The All India Radio, Nagpur, thus, broadcasts programmes of considerable variety keeping in view the traditions, tastes and local talents in surrounding areas.

Important events in and around Nagpur are covered through the media of radio reports, eye-witness accounts and running commentaries. The microphone is often taken to such places and the programme is broadcast simultaneously or recorded.

The scheduled programmes are published in the Akashvani and the press. The reaction of listeners is ascertained through letters received from them and the suggestions and criticisms are duly considered.

Community Radio Sets

Realising the importance of radio as a medium of communication the Government of Maharashtra introduced the Rural Broadcasting Contributary Scheme in-this district also, Under this scheme the Directorate of Publicity provides radio sets to rural institutions like grampanchayats, public libraries and municipalities. The Directorate not only installs the sets but also provides for their maintenance and servicing. Dry batteries are provided to the battery radio sets.

The community radio sets arc meant exclusively for the us of the public and the parties concerned are required to tune radio programmes relayed from the All India Radio, and especially the programmes for the villagers and workers.

 

For the installation of a community radio set parties, concerned are required to contribute Rs.150 for an electric set and Rs. 170 for a battery set. In addition they have to contribute Rs. 60 for maintenance which is inclusive of provision for battery and radio licence fee.

The benefits of this scheme are availed of to extent in this district. In June 1961 there were 107 community radio sets installed under the Scheme Nagpur district. The following is the tahsilwise list and towns where radio sets were installed up to June 1961.

Tahsil Village or town.
1. Katol 1) Ambada, (2) Belona, (3) Kalamba, (5) Metpanjara, (6)Narsingi (7)Sawargaon, (8) Sonkhamb (9) Thadiapauni (10) Yenwa, (11) Yerla (Dhote)
2. Nagpur 1) Ashta, (2) Bhogaon, (3) Bori (4) Dighori(5) Gumthala, (6) Khapa, (7)Khapa (8) Mahadula, (9) Mathni, (10) Nagpur,(11) Nagpur(12) Neri-Mankar,(13) Vihirgaon (14) Wadgaon, (15) Wadi, (16) Yerla.
3. Ramtek

(1) Ajni, (2) Banpuri, (3) Chaheer (4) Chirwha(5) Dahegaon-Joshi, (6) Dhanala (8) Karambhad, (9) Karwahi (10) Khat (11) Marodi, (12) Mohali, (13) Nagardhan (14) Niharwani, (15) Pardi, (16) Revrala (17) Sathak, (18) Tamaswadi, (19) Tharsa

4. Saoner (1) Adasa-Sonpur, (2) Badegaon, (3) Bhanegaon (4) Bhina, (5) Borgaon, (6) Borgaon (7) Dhapewadi, (8) Isapur (9) Kamathi (Talegaon), (10) Khapa ( Narsala) (11)Khubala, (12) Khumari, (13) khurasgaon (14) Malegaon, (15) Mangas; (16) Mandvi (17) Nanda-Gomukh, (18)parsodi (19)Pipala, (20) Salai, (21) Savali, (23) Telgaon, (24) Tembur-Doh (25)Tidangi, (26) Tishti Bk., (27)Umari (28)Waki, (29) Wakodi.
5. Umrer (1) Bela, (2) Besur, (3) Bori, (4) Champa (5) Chanoda, (6) Dhamangaon (7) Hewat (8) Hivra, (9) Jawali, (10) Kargaon, (11) Kinhi(12) Malewada, (13) Mangrud (14) Mandhal, (15) Mendha (16) Makhar-Dhokada, (17) Nagtaroli, (18) Nand (19)Navegaon, (20) Nokshi, (21)Pachgaon (22)Parsodi (Raja), (23) Pipra, (24)Savangi (25) Shivapur, (26) Shirpur, (27) Sirshi, (29) Surgaon, (30) Taka (31) Tasd(32)Titur.